Saturday, May 1, 2010

Eggs

Are these Ladybug eggs? I was going to pull out the dying peas (plus they are covered in aphids), but if the ladybugs are coming, then maybe I'll leave them in for a while longer...

5 comments:

The Younger Rachael said...

They sure look like it. I just googled "ladybug eggs" and all those pictures look like yours.

I've been out weeding today and I pulled several where the bottom then swarmed with what looked like itty-bitty baby ladybugs. I wonder....

RBell said...

"If you build it (aphid population), they (lacewings & ladybugs) will come." Funny how we plant butterfly gardens, but never plan gardens attractive to aphids to enhance ladybug populations. The start of a new trend?

The Younger Rachael said...

I was doing some research on companion gardening and read about planting nettles which aphids love so that you will already have a supply of ladybugs and lacewings when the aphids show up on other plants. I think just make sure to plant the nettles far enough from your other plants the aphids can't just jump. Certainly an idea, I wonder if it works.

LindaCTG said...

Sure looks like it! Yahoo! I wish I'd had your picture a few weeks ago. Next week on CTG, Trisha shows ladybugs in all their stages, but we couldn't nab any eggs. Don't pull out the icky plants while you have this going on. The aphids come, so the ladybugs come too. And watch for the crazy larvae, too funny. They look like little alligators snarfing up aphids. Aphids are the best way to ensure a good crop of ladybugs. Again, we'll have one in action on CTG next week or watch it online. Too cute! And congratulations to your new family.

Lancashire rose said...

I guess you'll have to leave those peas in there a bit longer. I just noticed a ladybug pupa on one of the plants I was planning to pull out. It really pays to know what all these eggs are doesn't it. Tomato horn worm! Squash vine borer. Now those are ones I won't be keeping.